Councillor’s Corner

River Ward Update

Hunt Club-Riverside Park Community Centre Now Open

Our community centre fall opening hours:

●  Weekdays (7:30 am – 9:30 pm)
●  Weekends (8:30 am – 4:45 pm)

The weight and cardio room has re-opened and is available by appointment for one-hour time slots during the above times and days. Visit the City’s website and click on “schedules” to reserve your spot. Up to four people are permitted per time slot. The library kiosks have been loaded with fresh items and the holds pickup service has returned. Rentals of the community centre will be considered within the updated restrictions.

After school care will be provided in September. Registration has been heavy.

Ottawa Public Library

The Ottawa Public Library’s Bookmobile continues to make pit stops in Hunt Club every week, including every Wednesday from 3:30-5pm at 3310 McCarthy Drive and at 185 Owl Drive from 6:15-8pm.

Consultations

Curbside Waste Diversion
The City of Ottawa is engaging on options for the Solid Waste Master Plan, and curbside garbage collection is up first. Between now and Sept. 12, the City is seeking your input on 3 options to divert more garbage:

Partial pay-as-you throw: Households would be allowed to place a set number of garbage items out for collection. Households with more than this limit would purchase garbage tags for each additional item. Recycling, organics, and leaf and yard waste would still be picked up without any tags and with no limits.

●  Reduced item limits: Households would set out a reduced number of garbage items for collection. Anything above the limit would not be collected.
●  Clear garbage bags with recycling and organics bans: Households would set out their garbage in clear bags. Recyclables and organic waste would not be permitted in the garbage.

Visit ottawa.ca/wasteplan to have your say by completing an online survey and signing up for virtual workshops.

Development

1026-1054 Hunt Club Road – Claridge Homes

Construction of the Foxview Retirement Community by Claridge Homes is just wrapping up and is scheduled to open in September. The 8-storey residence at 1026 Hunt Club Road near the Airport Parkway will feature 147 units. Claridge says it has set aside its plans for Phase 2 and it is not yet known if or when that will move forward. The City had been waiting for the company’s formal resubmission of its Phase 2 proposal for 1054 Hunt Club Road to address staff and community feedback. The company’s revised vision was to construct a 7-storey building with 77 rental apartment units with one and two bedrooms rather than an early vision of a 150-room hotel.

400 Hunt Club Road – Otto’s BMW Development Proposal

The zoning amendment application for 400 Hunt Club Road by Otto’s BMW has been lifted. This means that this application will not be heard at the Sept. 9 Planning Committee meeting. Otto’s has been considering plans to expand and lease lands from the Ottawa International Airport Authority to transform almost 4 acres of red pine forest into an employee parking lot and outdoor vehicle storage area. During separate meetings with the applicant and Airport officials, I have been very clear that suitable land is available in the vicinity that can yield a win to all parties. This must be reviewed. At the applicant’s request, the application was pulled from the meeting agenda to allow more time to review their application and consider different viable options. After this review, the applicant may choose to abandon their application for 400 Hunt Club Road or resubmit it and it will appear at a future Planning Committee meeting. This review will take a number of months to complete.

Thank you to community members who have been steadfast in their opposition to this application and who have mounted an unprecedented campaign that has brought an important focus on the value of urban forests. I applaud their efforts.

Riverside Drive at Hunt Club Road

Taggart Developments is kicking the tires again on this dormant file. I expect to learn more about their revised plans soon and will provide another update at the Sept. 13 HCCA meeting.

Parks & Greenspaces

McCarthy Park Basketball Court

Plans to construct a 15m x 28m regulation-size basketball court where the outdoor rink is in McCarthy Park at the Hunt Club-Riverside Park Community Centre are proceeding. The project will include a new asphalt pad, two removable uprights and new lighting. An accessible pathway will be added. The tender for the project closed August 5. Construction is expected this Autumn.

Uplands-Riverside Park

The lines of the basketball court in Uplands-Riverside Park in the Quinterra community, northwest of Hunt Club Road and Riverside Drive, are expected to be repainted this summer.

Reforestation Work
This fall, forestry staff will be doing tending and planting work in three areas of the ward where
ash trees were removed due to impacts by the Emerald Ash Borer.

●  Paul Landry Park,
●  the woodlot adjacent to the Airport Parkway and at the rear of Plante Drive and
●  the woodlot adjacent to the Airport Parkway at the rear of Cromwell Drive.

Following the removal of ash trees impacted by Emerald Ash Borer, and subsequent reforestation work, tending and planting operations are now required to ensure the successful rehabilitation of these wooded areas. Operations will include the removal and treatment of invasive plants and other competing species to allow for existing and planted native trees to succeed in addition to large-scale tree planting. Typical reforestation species include: red, sugar, and silver maple, bitternut hickory, blue-beech, burr and red oak, poplar species, white pine, white spruce, hemlock, larch, and dogwood. Operations are planned to begin the week of September 27. I have connected the Forestry Department with a community association member who has been very active on the reforestation plan for Paul Landry Park.

Roads & Infrastructure

Fibre Optic Installations

Telecon has been contracted by Bell Canada to install fibre optic networking cable on the City’s right-of-way along Uplands Drive, Gillespie Crescent, Rich Little Drive, Vanhurst Place, Archer Square, Country Club Drive, Chase Court, The Masters Drive, Fox Hunt Avenue, Ratan Court, Rhapsody Lane and Huntwood Court. Currently underway, the anticipated completion date is November 10. The work will include directional boring, where trenching is required, to place new Bell conduit. New Bell service wire and new grade-level boxes will be installed.

Telecon is also installing a new Bell Canada fibre optic network along the City’s right-of-way on Vizard Street, Hackett Street, Welby Court, Singler Place, Chatsworth Crescent, Gillespie Crescent from Uplands Drive to Hackett Street, Uplands Drive from North Bowesville Road to Gillespie Crescent, and Foxrun Lane from Uplands Drive to The Masters Drive. This work will also include directional boring, micro trenching, hydro excavation and existing conduit infrastructure. The project, including restoration, is expected to be complete by the end of September.

Both projects were granted municipal consent earlier this year. For questions or concerns, please email Customer.care@telecon.ca or call 1-833-386-8227.

McCarthy Road Curve

I remain persistent in my pursuit to improve the overall safety of the McCarthy curve, between Plante and the train tracks. Speed and carelessness is the number one factor that causes most vehicles to leave the road. I remain very concerned for the safety of pedestrians on the east side sidewalk and I am working with City staff to possibly try a new feature in 2022.

Airport Parkway Widening

The first phase of the Airport Parkway widening project, from Brookfield Road to Hunt Club Road, has been initiated and a Request for Qualifications has been completed. Four consulting firms have been shortlisted and will be invited to submit proposals to undertake the design work. City staff anticipate awarding the engineering design contract this fall with the design work to be complete by the end of 2023. Construction is currently scheduled to start early in 2024 with substantial completion anticipated by the end of 2025. As part of the widening project, a southbound off-ramp to Walkley Road and a roundabout will be built. When the off- ramp at Walkley opens, there is a proposal to reduce the number of travel lanes from 4 to 2 between the Parkway and McCarthy Road. A new multi-use pathway will also be added on the west side of the Parkway from Brookfield to Hunt Club.

Hunt Club Road Resurfacing

The westbound lanes of Hunt Club Road, from the Airport Parkway to Paul Anka Drive, are expected to be resurfaced this year. The project’s tender closed August 3. Construction is expected to begin this fall and take approximately one month to complete. I anticipate receiving an update soon once the contractor finalizes their project timelines.

Stage 2 Trillium LRT Construction

Greenboro LRT Station
The platform duct bank has been poured. Underway now is construction for the new platform slab and installation of the platform stairs. Upcoming work will include the installation of structural steel for the existing platform.

South Keys Station
Work continues for the under-slab insulation, waterproofing and base slab pour. Crews also continue to work on the north wing wall. Construction has started on the north grade beam. Also ongoing is the installation of underground plumbing and waterproofing of the station. Upcoming works will include structural steel installation for the station, the south distribution approach slab, base slab for the station and the pedestrian tunnel.

Hunt Club Rail-over-Road Bridge
The rail and pedestrian bridge over Hunt Club Rail continues to take shape. Vertical construction in the median of Hunt Club Road continues in preparation for the installation of the bridge supports later this fall. Crews will also be working on the rail bed in the north and south approaches to the rail bridge.

Events

E-Waste Depots

I held two successful electronic waste depots this year, one on April 24 at the Hunt Club- Riverside Park Community Centre where more than 30,000 pounds of waste was collected. On August 21, I co-hosted an electronic waste drop-off event with Alta Vista Councillor Jean Cloutier at the Jim Durrell Recreation Centre, my second depot this year. Just over 32,000 pounds of electronic waste were collected.

Household Hazardous Waste Depots

Mark your calendar. Future dates for The City of Ottawa’s household hazardous waste depots: ● Sept. 12, 8 am to 4 pm: Tunney’s Pasture
● Sept. 26, 8 am to 4 pm: Trail Road Waste Facility, 4475 Trail Road
● Oct. 24, 8 am to 4 pm: Westbrook Snow Dump, 200 Westbrook Road

River Ward Newsletter

Stay up to date on everything happening in your community by signing up for my monthly e- newsletter. Visit RileyBrockington.ca, scroll down to the bottom of the page, enter your email address under ‘Connect’ on the left, and click ‘Subscribe.

Riley Brockington
City Councillor, River Ward
Conseiller municipal, Quartier Rivière 613-580-2486

Riley.Brockington@Ottawa.ca

RileyBrockington.ca

What’s All the Fuss? Save ‘Hunt Club Forest’

Our Hunt Club community is enclosed on three sides by its own ‘greenbelt’.  At its western edge, residents in Quinterra-Woods enjoy the constructed storm water ponds, pathways and park along the Rideau River; at the north side, locals in Hunt Club Woods and Hunt Club Chase make constant use of, and vigilantly watch over the whole ‘southern corridor’ with its wooded lands; the inhabitants in Hunt Club Chase also enjoy the pathway around the Wendy Stewart Ponds, at the eastern border of our community.

What about the southern periphery of our community?  Well, for the past couple of generations, Hunt Club Estates (along with the Airbase, Windsor Park and more recently Wisteria Park) neighbours have been accessing the Red Pine wooded stand and its contiguous mixed, hardwood forest for recreational and nature activities.  It is their ‘little piece of paradise’, treasured by all.  This naturalizing forest used to extend all the way west to Billy Bishop Private until a big chunk of it was clearcut to put in the building occupied since 2005 by the Lowe-Martin Group.

One might argue that it is these urban green spaces, spread throughout the neighbourhoods mentioned above, that give Hunt Club its very flavour, its ‘brand’ – that which it is known for and continues to attract home buyers who choose it as their place to call home.  “Residents have a very strong preference for green spaces and nature in their community.” and “are concerned about the preservation of nature.” [1]

We know that the Red Pine stand was planted over sixty years ago as a monoculture ‘tree farm’.  Unfortunately, when this parcel of land was sold to the federal government, thus becoming crown land, it was totally neglected, never once thinned, as per good forestry practice.  Some would quickly point to this fact as a reason for it no longer having any value.  However, those who have been frequenting this area for the past 40 years know otherwise: they have observed nature at work, with an understory of new herbaceous plants and trees actively sprouting and growing throughout, giving it a more natural forest look.  As the saying goes, ‘one man’s garbage is another man’s treasure.’  Is it any wonder then, that community members want to keep this forest, with all its environmental benefits, and continue to access it in perpetuity to enjoy the recreational activities within it?  For a sampling of the variety of flora and fauna in this now thriving ecosystem: https://www.savehuntclubforest.ca/biodiversity/

One way to capitalize on this neglected Red Pine woodlot would be to regenerate it into a mixed, hardwood forest, transforming the entire area north of De Niverville Private, south of Hunt Club Rd and east of Billy Bishop Private into one continuous healthy forest.  Foresters know that “Red Pine dominated forests can be managed for increased habitat value and species biodiversity through greater use of ecological management techniques such as legacy retention, mixed-species and multi-age management, variable density thinning, and long rotations.” [2]      Many other advantages of an urban forest can be found here: https://www.savehuntclubforest.ca/about/

So what is the issue?  This crown land (approximately 14 hectares), currently designated as T1A in the City’s zoning framework, has been leased to the Ottawa International Airport Authority since 1997.   The Ground Lease signed between the OIAA and the Ministry of Transport includes the right to sublease these grounds for commercial development.   Indeed this is exactly what the OIAA has been planning for the strip of land now occupied by the Red Pine trees (and for other lands also zoned T1A).

It is the application made to the City of Ottawa, on behalf of Otto’s BMW car dealership, to allow for additional storage space along with a parking lot to be built at the east end of this parcel of land that brought this whole issue to light.   This  particular development would require a clear cutting of at least 4 acres of these Red Pines.  The moment the posters announcing this plan went up along the fence of the ‘Hunt Club Forest’, the community immediately mobilized to express its strong opposition to this plan.  A multi-prong campaign of daily protests along Hunt Club Rd, researching, letter writing, and phone calls quickly kicked into gear since early June.  To be clear: Although this application has been temporarily withdrawn from the City’s Planning Department, the file remains ‘active’, which means that it has not been cancelled:  https://www.savehuntclubforest.ca/2021/08/28/ottos-plans-parked/

We understand that the OIAA needs to ensure its own financial sustainability and that it seeks to increase its economic impact by generating employment and economic activity on its leased lands.  The economic gains by developing this strip, then subleasing it would be substantial, no doubt.  With the financial losses accrued by the OIAA over the last couple of years because of the whole pandemic situation, one can appreciate how this would be a welcomed strategy.

However, we are in a climate crisis and there are other ways that the OIAA can stimulate the local economy, without clear cutting these Red Pines.  The many nearby hotels could certainly market an urban forest within walking distance (or within a 5 minute drive) as an asset to prospective guests traveling here to attend conferences.  After a long day of workshops and meetings, a stroll in the woods is a great destresser.    Job opportunities could also be created for scientific research in silviculture  projects related to the forest’s regeneration and perhaps eradication of targeted invasive species.  The recognition of the community’s expressed desire to protect and preserve this urban forest is a great opportunity for the OIAA to raise its profile as a more respected ‘community partner’.

The OIAA still has access to another 580 hectares of land, roughly, (designated T1A for commercial development) to the east and west of the Airport Parkway, all potential sources of revenue, once sublet.  This includes the E Y Centre on Uplands Drive.   Would the potential development of these lands not provide the needed revenue to offset the losses sustained by the OIAA over the pandemic?  Once international travel happy Canadians start flying to their preferred destinations again, will that not quickly bring the OIAA’s revenues to the required levels?

Let us also remember the millions of dollars recently given to the OIAA by the federal government, first to support the cost of the new LRT being built to the airport, and then to help compensate for the losses caused by the Covid-19 situation.  The federal government also waived the OIAA’s rent fees for ten months in 2020 and for the whole 2021 year.  These facts are important to be aware of.

We are hoping that in this era of climate urgency, the OIAA, will honour its corporate culture of responsibility, respect of the environment, and of the local community; will work in partnership with the ministries of Transportation, Natural Resources and Environment, via our elected federal, provincial and municipal representatives; will demonstrate the kind of leadership expected from them; and will agree to amend their Ground Lease with Transport Canada, by removing the ‘Hunt Club Forest’ parcel of land from it, in order  that it be protected and preserved in perpetuity.  And that’s what all the fuss is about!

[1] Hunt Club Neighbourhood Plan – Existing Conditions Report, November 1997
[2]  http://ncrs.fs.fed.us/fmg/nggm/rp

 

History of CFB Uplands

The Ottawa International Airport and nearby CFB Uplands, our neighbours to the South, have a history going back to the 1920s.  The airport was a centre for military aviation during the Second World War and CFB Uplands was a base in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. The military aviation use is now limited, mainly No. 412 VIP Transport Squadron, while the base provides temporary accommodations.

Learn about the surprising history of CFB Uplands with this Sean’s Aviation video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIEeJc4qia4

 

Hunt Club’s Butterflyway Project

One snowy January morning, an email arrived from the David Suzuki Foundation, calling on communities across Canada to help restore habitats for local bees, butterflies and other pollinators on the verge of extinction. On a cold wintry day there is something deeply satisfying in dreaming of butterflies, and pink, purple and yellow flowers being kissed with plump bumblebees and hummingbirds. The images of Hunt Club’s green spaces and beautiful yards and gardens from my neighbourhood walks, rushed into my mind, and before I knew it, the Butterflyway cocoon was born.

Why You Should Care

One third of the food we eat and three quarters of world’s flowering plants depend on the tireless work of pollinators. They contribute to the biodiversity and resilience of ecosystems, to agricultural production and our nutritional security, and production in medicine, biofuels, fibres and even construction materials. The estimated economic value that pollinators create in the world’s crop production is approximately half a trillion dollars every year.

Beyond the economic impacts, global pollination experts warn that the extinction of pollinators would lead to an ecological and food production disaster of unseen proportions. While the volume of pollinator-dependant crops has grown by 300% in the last fifty years, the number and variety of pollinator species are in a consistent and staggering decline. Some 40 species of bees alone are being seriously endangered. The cumulative impacts of the extensive use of pesticides, intensive agriculture management, invasive plant species, pathogens, and pollution have led to a shrinking number of indigenous plants and a sharp decline of pollinator species and their habitats.

First Butterflyway Pollinator Patches

Thankfully in Hunt Club, Councillor Riley Brockington is championing the Butterflyway Project, and there are residents who are interested in helping to restore pollinator habitats.

As a result, the city has recently installed a pollinator patch at the Hunt Club Riverside Park Community Centre. With a bit of loving care, in two-to-three years from now, this will turn into a lush carpet of colourful wildflowers where pollinators can survive through the winter and thrive in warmer days. Similarly, volunteers on the Butterflyway Project will plant pollinator patches of varying sizes at several Hunt Club locations this summer, and at least five private properties will be hosting a Butterflyway pollinator patch. All these actions will help create habitats where pollinators can find food, water and shelter.

Councillor Riley Brockington in the first public space pollinator in Hunt Club

First Butterflyway pollinator patches in Hunt Club’s private yards and gardens  

We will be marking the locations of Butterflyway patches in Hunt Club’s public and private spaces, and adding pollinator gardens of all shapes and sizes, from a balcony’s mini patch to a garden pollinator site. Our vision is for Hunt Club to become a leading community in Ottawa in establishing pollinator patches, and we will strive to ensure that at least half are certified by the Canadian Wildlife Federation as a wild-life friendly habitat. Keep an eye on the map of local pollinator patches which will be updated periodically.

What You Can Do to Help

You can help out on the Butterflyway Project or plant a few wildflowers in planters or in your garden and ask your neighbours to do the same. Often the smallest things can make a big difference.

If you want to add your pollinator patch to Hunt Club’s pollinator patches map, or if you would like to volunteer on the Butterflyway project,  please complete the Volunteer Registration Form.   Learn more about Hunt Club’s Butterflyway Project here.

 

 

Councillor’s Corner

Ottawa’s Vaccination Updates
Beginning Tuesday, May 18, the Province extended vaccine appointments to residents 18 years and older. As of Sunday, May 23, youth between 12 and 17 years of age are eligible to book a vaccine. Book yours with the provincial online booking system at Ontario.ca/BookVaccine or call 1-833-943-3900.

Second dose information
Residents who are waiting to schedule the date of their second vaccine dose will be able to access an appointment within the specified interval. The second dose interval for some is approaching next month. A solution is in place to accommodate appointments for these individuals. Contact my office to have your name included on our second dose notification list if you require this information. You can also sign up for the COVID-19 vaccination updates e-subscription for regular news on the vaccine roll-out, including updates on second doses.

Hunt Club resurfacing
Hunt Club Road westbound from the Airport Parkway to Paul Anka Drive is scheduled to be resurfaced sometime this year. The project has yet to be finalized. Once it is, it will then go through the tender process and a contract will be awarded. Staff will keep my office updated and I will share information about the schedule and traffic impacts with the association and local residents.

Pollinator Garden
I am supporting the creation of a new pollinator garden with nine varieties of native wildflowers and two butterfly houses at the front of the Hunt Club-Riverside Park Community Centre this Spring. City staff are also planning to make “pollinators” the theme of the City’s summer camps at the centre and have the campers maintain the garden before local residents take over its care this autumn. The new garden is an excellent opportunity for residents of all ages to become involved in their local community, to instil a sense of local pride, support natural ecosystems and enhance the natural beauty of the area. The garden itself will feature asters, butterfly bushes, milkweed, echinacea, yarrow, salvia, black-eyed Susans, day-lilies and stonecrop/sedum.

Sawmill Creek Pathway Upgrades
Three segments of the Sawmill Creek Multi-Use Pathway are scheduled to be rehabilitated this year. One section is at the northern end to the west side of the pond, and west of the north end of the Greenboro Station’s park and ride. A second section is on the west side of the middle pond directly west of Loblaws at the South Keys Shopping Centre. The third location is on the east side of the southerly pond east of Michael’s at the shopping centre. The exact dates for the pathway’s rehabilitation in 2021 have not been finalized.

Stage 2 Trillium LRT Construction:
Work on the Trillium Line, which is extending south 16 kilometres from Bayview to Limebank in Riverside South, is progressing. This massive project includes eight new stations, renovations to five existing stations, a new Walkley Yard Maintenance and Storage Facility and an airport link. To date, the Stage 2 LRT Construction Team has installed 127 girders on 14 rail and pedestrian bridges across the entire O-Train South extension.

Greenboro LRT Station
Greenboro Station is an existing transfer station on the O-Train South Line that will receive a new, longer platform. Crews have completed demolition, and platform construction is underway. Structural backfilling is ongoing, as are formwork, rebar and concrete works. This year, crews will also continue prepping and laying track in this area. Across the South Line, track work between Walkley and Greenboro Stations is expected to be the first segment completed in Summer 2021.

South Keys LRT Station
Concrete foundation work is now complete at the new South Keys Station. Forming and reinforcement of the walls that will support the platform continue and installation of engineered, lightweight fill is underway north of the station. In the coming months, crews will proceed with installing light weight fill and utilities south of the station. Backfilling and waterproofing of the pedestrian tunnels and station walls are ongoing, as are formwork, rebar and concrete works at the platform level. A slight change in the temporary multi-use pathway was implemented April 21 and will be in place until June 14. This serves as a temporary detour of a segment of the MUP to route pedestrians and cyclists around the work zone and to maintain station access. Throughout the duration of the station’s construction, the MUP will be altered to make way for construction. Pedestrians and cyclists will be required to pay attention and adhere to flagging personnel and detour signage to reach their destination.

Hunt Club Rail-over-Road Bridge and MUP
The Hunt Club MUP will run along the rail bridge to connect South Keys Station via the Sawmill Creek Pathway to pathways south of Hunt Club Road. Pedestrians and cyclists using this new link will be safely separated from rail lines by a 2.4-metre-high cement barrier. The crane and drill rig have been demobilized from the Hunt Club Road median following the completion of the drilling of the caissons, which form the deep foundations that will support the bridge structure above. The remediation work now includes caisson remediation and excavation work to prepare for the column pours. Fencing has been installed around the site to minimize traffic disruptions.

Urban Cycling Workshop
Join me for Urban Cycling – a Virtual Workshop presented by EnviroCentre’s Let’s Bike Program on June 21 at 6:30 p.m. Delivered by an experienced cyclist, this workshop will provide participants with tips on incorporating cycling into their everyday lives. You’ll learn helpful hints, rules of the road, and receive advice on choosing a route to your destination. This workshop is adapted for cyclists of every age and ability. REGISTER AT: tinyurl.com/CycleWithMe

Riley Brockington.
City Councillor, River Ward
Conseiller municipal, Quartier Rivière
613-580-2486
Riley.Brockington@Ottawa.ca
RileyBrockington.ca

 

Puppy Walking for the Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind

Hello, my name is Kim and I am a Puppy Walker for Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind (CGDB).  You may have seen me around the neighbourhood walking Pebbles, who is a 16 month old Golden Retriever.  Pebbles has been living with my family since she was 4 months old.  She came to us as a friendly, rambunctious puppy – which she still is!  As part of the Puppy Walking program it is our job to help raise her to be a well mannered dog that has been socialized in as many different environments as possible.  That has been a challenge during Covid but Pebbles comes with me to as many places as possible.  Whether that be grocery shopping, going to appointments, or just running general errands.  The goal of a volunteer Puppy Walker is to help the dog get ready before they go to formal training at the Guide Dog Centre.  Typically puppies are placed in volunteer homes between 8-12 weeks old.  And will stay with that family for 12-18 months.  Pebbles has attended obedience classes run by CGDB and we meet with the program co-ordinator around once a month so they can check on her progress and help problem solve any issues we may be having.

Pebbles is the second dog that we have been Puppy Raising.  In March of 2020 the black lab that we had for the previous 18 months went in for formal training.  It was very hard to say goodbye to Dahlia.  But we knew she was destined for greatness!  And we were very proud that Dahlia successfully completed her training and started working as a Guide Dog in March of this year.  It was a bittersweet moment when we got to see her one last time before she started working.  But she was still the same sweet dog that loved getting belly rubs from everyone that she meets!  If you ever see me out walking with Pebbles while she has her training vest on then please do not approach or try to engage her.  It takes a lot of mental focus for a dog to learn what is expected from them.  And once they are working it could be dangerous to the client if the dog is not 100% focused on them.

Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind was founded in 1984 and does not receive any government funding.  They rely on donations from the public, often through fundraisers.  They provide Guide Dogs to clients across the country and Mobility Dogs in the Ottawa area.  If you’re wondering how you can help please check the CGDB website https://www.guidedogs.ca for volunteer opportunities and fundraising initiatives.

Thank you from Pebbles and all the other future Guide Dogs!

 

 Pebbles                                                             Dahlia

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS / GRADUATES:

You need a résumé: it is the document that tells employers about your qualification for a job and showcases how you could be an asset to a company. It contains your name and contact information, employment objective, education, experience, skills, achievements or interests.

A résumé shows your work history by date order, listing your last job first. If you have not had a job before, highlight your skills and expertise for specific jobs. A one-page résumé is recommended.

References: ask 2 teachers for references; get full name, telephone number and email.

Job Search: look for department stores, supermarkets, drugstores and other businesses within 10-15 minutes travel distance from your home. Go to each location, greet a staff member and hand in a résumé. If a company uses application forms, take the form home, read it carefully, complete it and return it with your résumé on the same day.

Interview answers: If you are applying for your first job, use the skills you learned during your Co-op placement to answer interview questions. Be honest and upbeat, show your ability to fit in as part of a team. Share positive experiences about sports, musical performance, poetry or helping classmates.

Attire: wear comfortable sneakers and casual summer clothing and neutral nail polish.

Ladies: no low-cut V-neck tops, spaghetti strap top, or blouse that exposes your belly button.

Gentlemen: no identifiable logo on t-shirts, no low-cut jeans with knees or underwear exposed.

For more details and examples see my website: http://www.lynettejosephsankey.ca/student.html

 

GetGrowing Hunt Club 2021

It’s all over except for the growing.  For the second year in a row, gardeners in Hunt Club were invited to sign up to receive a free seedling, package of vegetable seeds and an information pamphlet through GetGrowing Hunt Club.  This year 250 seed kit packages were delivered door to door.  The value of produce that can result from this locally grown harvest is $16,000!  That’s a lot of nutritious green beans and carrots and tomatoes!   As the growing season stretches in front of us, watch the Hunt Club Community Association Website, follow us on Facebook and Twitter , share pictures of your garden and learn of local initiatives such as opportunities to share excess produce.

GetGrowing Hunt Club is funded by the Hunt Club Community Association and City Councillor Riley Brockington.  We are grateful to our sponsors: Lee Valley Tools, Richmond Nursery, BWYL Group and Riocan.  And none of this would be possible without the many volunteers working with dedication and spirit during the COVID 19 pandemic.  All of it was done to deliver the promise of fresh locally grown produce to doorsteps in our ‘hood.  Thank you one and all!

Butterfly Puddling Station

On sunny summer days after rain, we may see butterflies gathering around the edges of mud puddles in nature. Have you ever wondered why? Butterflies get most of their nutrition from flower nectar but they need moisture. They also re-mineralize their bodies by bathing in mud puddles which are rich in salt and minerals.

If you wish to enjoy the sight of butterflies in your garden this season, help them by providing a butterfly puddling station. You can easily make it yourself! For this quick project you can use a bird bath which you may already have or just a larger-size terra cotta saucer with some gravel, and a couple of rocks on which the butterflies can land to sip mineralized water. If you do not have a terra cotta saucer at hand, use a plastic saucer. Either way, the saucer should have a raised edge so that butterflies can land easily. Fill the saucer with sand and a bit of manure compost, mix it together, and add water until the sand is wet. Place the saucer either in a bird bath, on a large flat stone or on the soil. Make sure to refill with water when the sand gets dry. Watch a step-by-step video on how to make butterfly puddling station.

Butterfly Puddling Station

Also, on the top of your puddling station (for example, at one corner), you can place another smaller-size saucer with fruits (ripe or overripe) such as banana, sliced apples, oranges or other. Butterflies and other insects will love it.

Be Cool

Ottawa is a great place to live, but nobody chooses it for the climate. Summer heat and winter cold are stressful. We look forward to warmth in January and get too much of it in July. Here are tips for living more comfortably when the thermometer climbs.

Know the weather conditions beforehand. There’s plenty of weather information via the media and short-term forecasts are very accurate. Plan activities accordingly. Listen for heat warnings from the City and know places where you can cool off.

Hunt Club has two splash pads, at Owl Park and McCarthy Park. Two others are nearby south of Walkley. Arnett Park is west of McCarthy and Stanstead Park to the east. Mooney’s Bay beach is close by.

Wear light clothing, which reflects the sun’s rays, and sunscreen. Be especially careful if you are susceptible to sunburn. Limit exposure and be sure to reapply sunscreen after going in the water.

Avoid exercising at peak hours of heat, or exercise in an air-conditioned gym. Plan outdoor exercise during the early morning or evening. If competing in an event during the heat of the day acclimatize your body to conditions in advance.

Drink fluids regularly. We perspire and lose water to cool off. If your mouth feels dry it’s a sign of dehydration so drink plain water and plenty of it. Infants, children, and the elderly need to be especially careful not to become dehydrated. Sports drinks may be appropriate to replace electrolytes if exercising for an hour or more.

 

 

The Highs and Lows of Hunt Club

Do you recognize this place in our community? Hunt Club Creek flows into the Rideau River, just upstream from the rail bridge and the lowest point in Hunt Club, about 76 m above mean sea level.

Reach it from a trail that winds beside the creek from the north end of Rivergate Way. There’s easier access from Old Riverside Drive north of the train tracks.

Just over 1 Km from the lowest point is the highest — at 112 m — on the grounds of the Hunt and Golf Club. While there is no public access, adjacent Riverside Drive rises to 107m. The ground ascends to 119m at the airport.

Another high point in our community is north of McCarthy Road, from the Quarry Coop to Huntview Condominiums rising to 106m.

Find out the elevation where you live at https://en-ca.topographic-map.com/maps/q4e/Ottawa/